Cybercrime could cost the world almost $1 trillion in 2020, McAfee says

The annual global cost of cybercrime this year is estimated to be around $945 billion, which is more than 1% of the global gross domestic product (GDP).

(Subscribe to our Today’s Cache newsletter for a quick snapshot of top 5 tech stories. Click here to subscribe for free.)Cybercrime incidents could cost the world nearly a trillion dollars this year, increasing by over 50% since 2018.The annual global cost of cybercrime this year is estimated to be around $945 billion, which is more than 1% of the global gross domestic product (GDP), according to security firm McAfee. The losses were estimated to be around $600 billion in 2018.Nearly two-thirds of the companies surveyed reported some form of cyber incident in 2019. The most common cyber frauds include economic espionage, intellectual property (IP) theft and ransomware attacks. IP theft and financial crime account for at least 75% of the total cyber losses and pose the greatest threat to companies, the cybersecurity firm noted.Also read | Festival season online shopping creates perfect storm for cybercrime, McAfee saysA survey of 1,500 IT managers and other organisational decision-makers around the globe revealed that cybercrimes also led to longer recovery periods and reduced efficiency. A third of respondents stated that IT security incidents, resulting in system downtime, cost them up to $500,000.Average interruption of operations was about 18 hours. Rehabilitating the external image of the brand after a cyberattack also formed a part of the overall cost, companies said.More than half companies are unprepared to face cyberattacks, the report stated. This makes companies vulnerable to sophisticated social engineering tactics and the inability to curb damage once the security has been compromised.

A letter from the Editor
Dear subscriber,Thank you!Your support for our journalism is invaluable. It’s a support for truth and fairness in journalism. It has helped us keep apace with events and happenings.The Hindu has always stood for journalism that is in the public interest. At this difficult time, it becomes even more important that we have access to information that has a bearing on our health and well-being, our lives, and livelihoods. As a subscriber, you are not only a beneficiary of our work but also its enabler.We also reiterate here the promise that our team of reporters, copy editors, fact-checkers, designers, and photographers will deliver quality journalism that stays away from vested interest and political propaganda.Suresh Nambath

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *